Colonial Divide & Rule

A talk by Prof. Mohan Dutta on Colonial Divide & Rule

In this talk, Professor Mohan Dutta critically analyses colonial divide and rule strategy. He then explores the work of decolonisation as building connection.


CARE Public Talk: White Supremacy, the Intersections of Anti-Māori Hate and Anti-Migrant Racism: The Targeting of Te Tiriti

White Supremacy, the Intersections of Anti-Māori Hate and Anti-Migrant Racism: The Targeting of Te Tiriti This talk explores the convergence between anti-Māori hate and anti-migrant racism in the context of the attack on Te Tiriti. It notes that the white supremacy that seeks to undermine Te Tiriti is also the ideology that seeks to silence and expel migrants of colour. Based on the analysis, it argues for migrant- Māori solidarity based on Te Tiriti as the foundation for sustaining social cohesion in Aotearoa.


CARE VISITING LECTURE SERIES: Traditional Children’s Games in India: Reviving and Renewing Precolonial Inclusive Practices with Prof. Tanmoy Bhattacharya, University of Delhi

CARE proudly welcomes Prof. Tanmoy Bhattacharya, Head Department of Linguistics, University of Delhi, as CARE ‘s visiting academic for the month of June 2023.

CARE extends a warm invite to all to join Prof. Tanmoy Bhattacharya’s lecture on Traditional Children’s Games in India: Reviving and Renewing Precolonial Inclusive Practices scheduled on 20th June 2023 in Manawatu in collaboration with Palmerston North City Library & Manawatu Multicultural Council (MMC)

See event details below:

CARE VISITING LECTURE SERIES: Traditional Children’s Games in India: Reviving and Renewing Precolonial Inclusive Practices with Prof. Tanmoy Bhattacharya, University of Delhi

Talk Abstract

Traditional Children’s Games in India: Reviving and Renewing Precolonial Inclusive Practices

In this talk I question the western disability studies theories of inclusion and show they can be unpacked and informed through simple notions of innovations through informality. Various traditional Indian children’s games are analysed to show how they teach us ways of including the disabled child in innovative ways. The talk addresses both the theory and politics of the condition of postcoloniality through an “attribute of subordination” reflected in the changing character of traditional children’s games in India.

DATE: 20th JUNE 2023 | TIME: 12:00 PM NZST 

Venue: Second Floor, Palmerston North City Library-Central Library


A detailed Bio of Tanmoy Bhattacharya

Tanmoy Bhattacharya is Professor and Head of the Department of Linguistics, University of Delhi. He guides research on Syntax, Psycholinguistics, Gender, Disability, Deaf Education, and Sign Linguistics. Prof. Bhattacharya completed his B.A. (Chemistry) & M.A. (Linguistics) from DU (University of Delhi), and then went to complete his first Ph.D. in Linguistics from the University of Hyderabad (1995), and the second Ph.D. from University College London (UCL) as a Commonwealth scholar (1999).
He has held research & academic positions at School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS, University of London, UK), Universität Leipzig (Germany), University College London (UCL, England), M. S. University (Baroda), and University of Hyderabad (UoH, Hyderabad). In his doctoral work, he tried to explore both big and small constructions in natural language, with the investigations confirming the Chomskyan universal grammar project of the generative enterprise. In the domain of syntax, he has carried out extensive and original research on topics such as NP structures, WH-constructions, superiority, sluicing, clause-internal complementizers and polar questions in a number of Indo-Aryan and Tibeto-Burman languages. His most recent work has been on the topic of agreement in which he has brought to the fore the importance of many languages of Bihar (for example, Maithili, Magahi and Angika, among others), Jharkahand, Odisha (languages such as Santhali, Kurmali), Mizoram (namely, Mara) and Nepal (viz. Bantawa) in forming a sprachbund of multiple agreement comprising a vast chunk of the Himalayan foothills, the East, and Northeast of India.
He has been the member-convener of an UGC Committee on Disability and Higher Education and the Coordinator of the Equal Opportunity Cell, University of Delhi, where he has taught Disability and Human Rights. He is the Chairperson, Expert Committee on development of training program on Indian Sign Language, Rehabilitation Council India. Within the field of disability, he specialises in Disability Studies, Deaf Education, and Inclusive Education.
Apart from 87 journal papers/ book chapters, Prof. Bhattacharya has been the editor/ co-editor of four books published from Mouton, John Benjamins and Orient Blackswan. He has delivered 220 invited/ conference talks till date at different conferences/ events. He has been the chief editor of Indian Linguistics (2015-2017). He is an Associate Editor of the peer-reviewed international journal Linguistic Variation, published from John Benjamins Publishing, and is one the Chief Editors of the journal Indian Journal of Critical Disability Studies.
More recently, with the desire to bring linguistics and related technology closer to popular science, he has been involved in writing on migration and evolution through an essay series on ‘Peopling of the Northeast of India’ and ‘Being Human, Again’ (published since 2016). This has led his technical expertise in linguistics to also bear upon the question of ‘peopling’ by looking at the linguistic evidence along with the genetic and archaeological.

LIVE STREAMING ONLINE

Facebook LIVE page: @CAREMassey

Link: https://www.facebook.com/events/225044887004995

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Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i-U4ec_tpxw

RSVP ON CARE Facebook page : @CARE Massey/events

Link: https://www.facebook.com/events/225044887004995

#Aotearoa#CareCCA, #CareMassey#CareMasseyNZ, #CAREVisitingLectureSeries#MasseyUni#NewZealand

CARE PUBLIC TALK SERIES: Transforming Indigenous Education: Kaupapa Māori Enactment with Distinguished Prof. Graham Hingangaroa Smith, Massey University

CARE PUBLIC TALK SERIES : Transforming Indigenous Education: Kaupapa Māori Enactment with Distinguished Prof. Graham Hingangaroa Smith,Distinguished Professorial Chair, Te Toi Ihorei ki Pūrehuroa, Massey University

Date: THURSDAY 26th NOVEMBER 12 PM NZDT
Venue: Mezzanine Floor (1 Floor Entrance), Palmerston North City LibraryJoin the Facebook

Livestream on @caremassey

Link: https://www.facebook.com/CAREMassey/posts/4290919210924451

Talk Abstract:The title transforming Indigenous education is deliberately ambiguous – both meanings are intended. That is, given the persistence of high and disproportionate outcomes of inequality within Māori and Indigenous communities there needs to be transformative change with respect to both the processes and outcomes of education. We will not have a revolution of our unequal social and economic conditions without a prior or simultaneous educational revolution. In this presentation I argue the need for Indigenous educators to be able to work across the intersections of simultaneously being a scholar, critical activist and transformer.In this presentation Prof. Smith shares stories that illustrate this approach and challenge the dominant institutional pressures to become ‘privatized’ academics.About the Speaker:Professor Smith is a prominent and internationally regarded Māori educationalist and scholar who has been at the forefront of transforming Māori and Indigenous education and schooling. His work links theoretical thinking and practical applications within an ongoing cycle of transformative praxis.Professor Smith’s earlier training was in Social Anthropology and he completed a MA (Hons) dissertation on ‘Māori Rituals of Encounter’ entitled ‘The Significance of Green Leaves in Pohiri Ritual’. He trained as a teacher at Auckland Teachers College and taught in Auckland schools. He also lectured in Education at Auckland College of Education. He was one of the first teachers and developers of a Kura Kaupapa Māori – a Māori philosophy and principles-based School. These schools have grown from a single entity in 1988 to over seventy-five publicly funded schools in 2015. His theoretical leadership in the Education Department at the University of Auckland helped inform the emergence of Māori Education as a distinct field of study across the New Zealand Tertiary Sector. This work has encouraged a wide range of academic studies focused on overthrowing persisting inequities within and as a result of education and schooling in New Zealand. His significant contribution to New Zealand education is to be seen in his work related to Kaupapa Māori as a theory of Transformative Praxis.#CAREPublicTalkSeries#Transforming#IndigenousEducation#Kaupapa#Māori#Enactment#Aotearoa#NewZealand
#CARECCA#CAREMassey#MasseyCJM#MasseyUni#PNCC#PalmerstonNorthCityLibrary See Less

CARE Visiting Lecture -Public Talk – Dr. Laura Miller -University of Tennessee

Communicating about cancer: Considerations for identity and uncertainty management

Date: Thursday, 20 Feb 2020 Time: 12pm – 1pm
Location: BSC 1.06 CARE Lab, Manawatu campus. Massey University
RSVP: https://www.facebook.com/events/1526896230798430/

Talk Abstract:
Communicating about cancer presents many challenges for patients and their families. Uncertainty is prevalent across the survivorship trajectory; specifically, questions regarding recurrence, unexplained symptoms, and renegotiating relational roles all may persist after cancer treatment is completed. This talk will consider the communication processes and uncertainty management strategies patients and families engage in throughout a cancer experience and beyond.

Short Bio:
Laura Miller received her PhD from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She is currently an Associate Professor in the School of Communication Studies at the University of Tennessee in the USA. Her works explores how individuals communicate about health, how families communicate support amid health stressors, and how illness-related uncertainty is managed. She is passionate about global education and has taught in Beijing, Dublin, and Sydney.

CARE Public Talk by Dr.Sameer Deshpande: CCA & Social Marketing- 5th Dec 2019- GLB1.14, Manawatu campus

Speaker Bio:

Dr. Sameer Deshpande, PhD

Dr. Deshpande is Associate Professor and Acting Director of the Social Marketing Department at Griffith University in Brisbane, Australia. Sameer teaches, trains, and conducts research in social marketing. He is the Editor of Social Marketing Quarterly. Over two decades, Sameer has raised over two million dollars and published studies testing effectiveness of social marketing framework with special emphasis on consumer-insights approach in a variety of contexts, including promotion of alternative rides, responsible drinking, alcohol abstinence during pregnancy, water rights, safe sexual practices, and physical activity. Sameer has widely published in academic journals, books, and conference proceedings. Prior to joining Griffith, Sameer offered services in the U.S., Canada, India, and Singapore.

Dr. Sameer Deshpande

Associate Professor (Social Marketing), Acting Director (Social Marketing @ Griffith)

Department of Marketing, Griffith Business School, Griffith University

Event: Registrations- https://www.facebook.com/events/1419311748220389/

Follow us on : Facebook :@CAREMassey  – Youtube: @CAREMasseyNZ – Twitter: @CAREMasseyNZ

 

CARE Activist-In-Residence: Jolovan Wham from Community Action Network, Singapore

Center for Culture-Centered Approach to Research and Evaluation (CARE) is proud to share and invite our next Activist in Residence – Mr. Jolovan Wham.

Jolovan Wham is a Singaporean of ethnic Chinese descent. He has been involved in human rights activism, working primarily on issues relating to migrants, the death penalty, and freedom of expression.

He was executive director of Humanitarian Organisation for Migration Economics (HOME), an NGO which provides shelter, education opportunities and legal aid for low waged migrant workers.

He is a member of the Community Action Network, a coalition of activists which promotes civil and political rights. He obtained his bachelor’s degree in social work from the National University of Singapore. His activism has resulted in him being banned by the education minister from speaking at education institutions and campuses.

He will be presenting a Public Talk, Workshop & will be collaborating with Prof. Mohan Dutta,Director,- CARE at Massey University on the topic “Communicative strategies for resisting authoritarianism”.

The event details are as below.


Center for Culture-Centered Approach to Research and Evaluation (CARE) presents our next Activist In Residence Public Talk by  Mr. Jolovan Wham

Title: First world authoritarianism: Lessons from Singapore
Date & Time: Wednesday, 27th November @ 12:00 – 1:00 pm
Venue: Palmerston North City Library, Events Centre, Ground Floor, Palmerston North.

Public Talk Abstract:

Authoritarianism is said to be on the rise and democracy in retreat in many parts of the world. Commentators often point out this trend in long standing liberal democracies like the United States but also to the consolidation of power in regimes like China and Russia. What can we learn from Singapore’s experience to combat the rise of authoritarianism? In this talk, Mr Wham will talk about one party rule in Singapore, how it is perpetuated and the State’s and Singapore society’s response to activism and advocacy.


Other events:

CARE Workshop – Dissent and resistance: Negotiating boundaries in Singaporean activism by Mr. Jolovan Wham –

Workshop Title:
CARE Workshop – Dissent and resistance: Negotiating boundaries in Singaporean activism by Mr. Jolovan Wham
Date & Time: Thursday, 28th November @ 12:00-1:00 pm
Venue: GLB3.02 Manawatu, Massey University
Topic: A free workshop on Dissent and resistance: Negotiating boundaries in Singaporean activism by Mr. Jolovan Wham.

Workshop Abstract:

Activists in one party states or dictatorships are often detained and imprisoned for years. In some cases, they are murdered and disappeared. The Singapore state eschews such extreme tactics and yet retains almost absolute control over the population. What are the opportunities for dissent and resistance in such a controlled environment? What tactics and strategies have activists used to achieve their goals?


Center for Culture-Centered Approach to Research and Evaluation (CARE) Activist In Residence White Paper Launch- Communicative strategies for resisting authoritarianism by Jolovan Wham & Mohan Dutta 

White Paper Title : Communicative strategies for resisting authoritarianism
Date: Friday 29th November 2019 @ 12 pm – 1 pm
Venue: Business Studies Central BSC 1.08, Manawatu campus Massey University
Livestream on FB: @CAREMassey

Come and hear our speakers launch the CARE White Paper & hear them talk abouttheir white paper on

“Communicative strategies for resisting authoritarianism”

Speaker’s Bio:
Jolovan Wham: is a Singaporean of ethnic Chinese descent. He has been involved in human rights activism, working primarily on issues relating to migrants, the death penalty, and freedom of expression. He was executive director of Humanitarian Organisation for Migration Economics (HOME), an NGO which provides shelter, education opportunities and legal aid for low waged migrant workers. He is a member of the Community Action Network, a coalition of activists which promotes civil and political rights. He obtained his bachelor’s degree in social work from the National University of Singapore. His activism has resulted in him being banned by the education minister from speaking at education institutions and campuses.

Mohan J Dutta: is Dean’s Chair Professor of Communication. He is the Director of the Center for Culture-Centered Approach to Research and Evaluation (CARE), developing culturally-centered, community-based projects of social change, advocacy, and activism that articulate health as a human right. Mohan Dutta’s research examines the role of advocacy and activism in challenging marginalizing structures, the relationship between poverty and health, political economy of global health policies, the mobilization of cultural tropes for the justification of neo-colonial health development projects, and the ways in which participatory culture-centered processes and strategies of radical democracy serve as axes of global social change.