CARE Special Presentation: Palestine Solidarity and Ramadan with Dr. Fatima Junaid, Tayyaba Khan and Anthony Green

Join us online on Tuesday 09 April 2024, 7pm for CARE’s Special Presentation on Palestine Solidarity and Ramadan with Dr. Fatima Junaid, Tayyaba Khan and Anthony Green.

A conversation around solidarity and the dissonance that Muslims are feeling during Ramadan and may feel at Eid as we keep seeing the Palestinian Genocide.

Supporting each other to keep going with the solidarity efforts and acknowledging that any effort is good as long as we are not silent. Please join us as we ponder on the question of what it means to have Eid in these times.

Livestream Links:

CARE Facebook Page:

https://www.facebook.com/events/957996199291968/

CARE YouTube Channel:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCF760E7rBst3U5GmJ5FhDDw

Reading:

Below is a document prepared by Anthony Green for the online talk supported by CARE – Center for Culture-Centered Approach to Research and Evaluation.

A selection of some different perspectives on the uses of language and on ways of seeing – a few examples of texts and sources that may be of interest.

Presenters:

Dr. Fatima Junaid

Dr. Fatima Junaid is an experienced consultant and educator working within public and private sector for over a decade. Dr. Junaid has done extensive research with marginalized communities including refugees, women, migrants and fishers’ communities. She focuses on developing mechanisms of support for better wellbeing outcomes. Currently she is a Senior lecturer at Massey University and a member of the several wellbeing (academic and professional) organisations. She also runs a social media support network group for Pakistani women in academia.

Dr Junaid can be reached at f.junaid@massey.ac.nz or

https://www.linkedin.com/in/fatimajunaid1/

Tayyaba Khan

Founder and trustee of Khadija Leadership Network, the New Zealand (NZ) Peace Ambassador for the European Muslim League, former Director of Advocacy at the Office of the Health and Disability Commissioner, and a community development practitioner with over 15 years of experience having worked with the migrant and refugee communities in The Occupied Territories of Palestine, Australia, United Kingdom and New Zealand. Tayyaba currently sits on the governance board of Mixit & Belong Aotearoa. She is also a regular panellist on RNZ’s ‘The Panel’, and ‘The AM Show’.

Anthony Green

Originally from the UK, he worked as a teacher of English and Literature, first in the UK and then, for eighteen years in Singapore. In the six months’ period after the mosque attacks, and again in the 2020 “anniversary,” he served as spokesperson for the Muslim Association of Canterbury

His writings include books commissioned by Muis (Majlis Ugama Islam Singapura, Singapore’s Islamic Council), dealing with all aspects of the development and work of that body: its history, mosque-building programme, Hajj organisation, and more. His own work includes a history of how people travelled by sea from Southeast Asia to journey to Mecca for the Hajj. His interest is in people’s stories, particularly of those who are “unsung” – what the poet Brian Patten called, “the loose change history spent without caring.”

Image by Palestinian photographer Hosny Salah, currently living in Palestine Gaza Strip

https://pixabay.com/users/hosnysalah-10285169/

CARE Twitter page:

The Urgency of Addressing Palestinian Mental Health in Times of Genocide: Special Presentation

A conversation with Dr Samah Jabr

Through her responses to a series of wide-ranging questions, Dr. Samah Jabr, Head of the Mental Health Unit within the Palestinian Ministry of Health, gives essential insights into the ways to understand Palestinian mental health before, during, and after catastrophe and genocide. By invoking the principle of “observing and learning” from Palestinians in Gaza and the West Bank, Dr. Jabr challenges western pathologizing and individualizing around mental health, and offers a community-centered and liberatory alternative framework.

Professor Walid Adel Afifi, Dept of Communication; Associate Dean, Division of Social Science, University of California – Santa Barbara

Associate Professor Guido Veronese, in Clinical and Community Psychology, University of Milan-Bicocca, Italy.

Visiting at Gaza Community Mental Health Program, Gaza where I teach Family Therapy.

Dr. Samah Jabr, consultant Psychiatrist, Head of the Mental Health Unit, MoH

Acknowledgements:

Image by Palestinian photographer Hosny Salah, currently living in Palestine Gaza Strip

Link: https://pixabay.com/users/hosnysalah-10285169/

Music: Native American Drums 2 Hours, Royalty Free Music by Kevin MacLeod

Hate Effects of Jai Shree Ram: Professor Dutta Explores Ayodhya Temple’s Role in Hindutva Mobilization Across India

In this final video of the series on The Hate Effects of Jai Shree Ram, Professor Mohan Dutta discusses the Ayodhya Temple as the backdrop for the broader mobilisation for Hindutva across India. He argues how Ayodhya serves as an entry point for the ongoing organisation of Hindutva, aimed at attacking Muslim spaces and heritage sites to establish India as a Hindu nation.

You can watch other videos from The Hate Effects of Jai Shree Ram series here:
Video 5
Video 4
Video 3
Video 2
Video 1

Hate Effects of Jai Shree Ram: Professor Dutta Explores How Ayodhya Temple Celebrations Fuel Hindutva’s Narrative of Hindu Pride

Professor Mohan Dutta, Director of CARE, sheds light on how videos circulating on X (Twitter) depicting the celebrations surrounding the inauguration of the Ayodhya Temple become mobilizing anchors for deploying the narrative of Hindu pride. Within this narrative of reclaiming the lost glory of Hinduism, violence is legitimised. Portraying the Hindu majority as victims of Muslim invaders and framing sites of grievance as the politics of grievance, while depicting minorities as perpetrators of crimes, often form the architecture for violence and fascist organising, a key feature of Hindutva.

You can watch other videos from The Hate Effects of Jai Shree Ram series here:
Video 5
Video 4
Video 3
Video 2
Video 1

Hate Effects of Jai Shree Ram: Prof. Dutta Analyzes Social Media Videos Depicting Hindutva Mob Violence Against Muslims Amid ‘Jai Shree Ram’ Chants

In the fourth installment of the compelling series “The Hate Effects of Jai Shree Ram,” Professor Dutta delves into the disturbing footage circulating on X (Twitter). These videos capture alarming instances of Hindutva mobs unleashing violence upon Muslims across India, all while fervently chanting “Jai Shree Ram.”


You can watch other videos from The Hate Effects of Jai Shree Ram series here:
Video 5
Video 4
Video 3
Video 2
Video 1

The Hate Effects of Jai Shree Ram – Video 2

In Video 2 of the series The Hate Effects of Jai Shree Ram, Professor Dutta brings to light videos that surfaced on X (Twitter) where Hindutva mobs are seen attacking Muslim shops and Muslim shop owners, while chanting “Jai Shree Ram.”

You can watch other videos from The Hate Effects of Jai Shree Ram series here:
Video 5
Video 4
Video 3
Video 2
Video 1

Hate Effects of Jai Shree Ram: Professor Dutta Addresses Violence Attached With ‘Jai Shree Ram’ Chants

In the inaugural video of the series titled ‘The Hate Effects of Jai Shree Ram,’ Professor Dutta, Director of CARE, addresses the pervasive violence associated with the slogan “Jai Shree Ram.” He argues that the chanting of this slogan must be understood within its contextual framework, particularly when utilised by Hindutva mobs in large gatherings. Professor Dutta highlights that in such settings, the chanting serves as a precursor to violence, often utilised as a means to perpetrate acts of aggression.


You can watch other videos from The Hate Effects of Jai Shree Ram series here:
Video 5
Video 4
Video 3
Video 2
Video 1

Highbury Community Garden Initiative: CARE’s Community Researcher Venessa Pokaia updates

Update 3

CARE’s Community Researcher Venessa Pokaia updates us on how the Maori-centred and driven Highbury community garden is coming along.

This is part of the Pā Tamariki initiative, a community-led culture-centered social cohesion intervention created by the Highbury Advisory Rōpū, built by tangata whenua community researchers at the Center for Culture-centered Approach to Research and Evaluation (CARE) in partnership with the community in Highbury.