CNM-CARE Research Talk: Repositioning The World’s Health- By Professor Sanjoy Bhattacharya

Abstract:

What is the World Health Organisation? Its Headquarters in Geneva? Or, is it a more dispersed international entity, which engages and deals with disparate polities in order to stay effective and relevant? In all this, how can we conceptualise the historic formation, underpinning negotiations and impact of the WHO Regional Offices, which are the legal entities that negotiate and work with national governments on a daily basis? Professor Sanjoy Bhattacharya uses recent histories of international and global health projects to question a series of presumptions that continue to colonise scholarship about the value of the idea and work of a relatively small sets of actors. In so doing, he argues for the need for greater transparency and democracy in inter-sectoral partnerships that aims to improve global health and well-being.

Speaker: 

Sanjoy Bhattacharya is Professor in the History of Medicine Department of History, University of York, UK. He studied at St. Stephen’s College, University of Delhi (India); Jawaharlal Nehru University (New Delhi, India), and the School of Oriental and African Studies (London, UK). He is a Wellcome Trust Senior Investigator working on the history and contemporary workings of Primary Health Care and the provision of Universal Health Coverage in South Asia. Sanjoy also continues to work on the histories of the worldwide eradication of smallpox, and the migration, experiences and contribution of South Asian doctors in the UK’s National Health Service.

1 March 2018
3:00 PM – 4:00 PM

VENUE CHANGED

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
Block AS6, Lecture Theatre 14 (LT14)

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
Block AS6, #03-33, CNM Meeting Room

Register at cnmn.us/who.

The Role of Indigenous Rights In Rainforest Preservation, Two Perspectives: Presented by Joe Lamb and Dr Jose Fragoso

WHY YOU NEED TO ATTEND: Indigenous groups in Sarawak, Malaysia, when faced with a large-scale development project that would displace thousands of people, and destroy large swathes of rainforest, launched a successful campaign to stop the construction of the Baram Dam. Learn how the land’s natives worked together with researchers from the University of California to propose alternative sources of energy that would be less costly, less fragile, and more efficient. The collaboration remains an example of how research can not only redefine the foundations of development that respects both human rights and the environment, but also amplify the voices of communities.

Date: 6 November 2017
Time: 4:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Venue: Research Division Seminar Room, Block AS7, #06-42, Shaw Foundation Building

Register Online

[FEBRUARY TALKS] Dr Binod C Agrawal and Dr Tejaswini Niranjana

Last month, CARE invited Dr Binod Agrawal and Dr Tejaswini Niranjana to give a talk on their research they have done in India. Dr Binod shared with us his research on how satellite communication technology has performed and developed in India while Dr Tejaswini presented her research on the process of becoming a woman in India in the age of globalisation. You can watch the recordings of both talks below. Enjoy!

[12 FEBRUARY] DR BINOD C AGRAWAL PROMISES AND PERFORMANCES OF SATELLITE COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY FOR DEVELOPMENT IN INDIA

[24 FEBRUARY] DR TEJASWINI NIRANJANA THE REORGANISATION OF DESIRE: CULTURAL LIVES OF YOUNG WOMEN IN GLOBALISING INDIA